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The contributions of genetics and genomics to occupational safety and health.

Authors
Schulte-PA
Source
Occup Environ Med 2007 Nov; 64(11):717-718
NIOSHTIC No.
20032881
Abstract
In an era when the biomedical community is extolling the benefits of genetic technologies and advances, the question arises whether these benefits may also have a positive impact on occupational safety and health (OSH). Historically, genetic factors have not been widely considered in OSH. Has any change occurred in recent years, or can we expect change in the near future? Genetic factors contribute to the variable responses of workers to occupational hazards - particularly chemical hazards and some biological and physical agents. Although increasingly workplace exposures are being controlled to lower concentrations, workers with susceptible genetic profiles may still be at unacceptably high risk. There is a broad range of published evidence showing that genetic polymorphisms can lead to differential occupational disease risks in exposed workers. Clearly, genetic technology has been useful in these studies of occupational disease and chemical exposures.
Keywords
Chemical-hypersensitivity; Exposure-levels; Exposure-methods; Genes; Genetic-factors; Genetics; Biological-agents; Biological-effects; Biological-factors; Biological-monitoring; Biological-systems; Biohazards; Work-environment; Exposure-levels
Contact
PA Schulte, NIOSH, EID, CDC, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226
CODEN
OEMEEM
Publication Date
20071101
Document Type
Other
Email Address
pas4@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
1351-0711
NIOSH Division
EID
Source Name
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
OH
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