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Characteristics of moose-vehicle collisions in Anchorage, Alaska, 1991-1995.

Authors
Garrett-LC; Conway-GA
Source
J Saf Res 1999 Dec; 30(4):219-223
NIOSHTIC No.
20032861
Abstract
Moose have successfully adapted to Anchorage's urban environment, using greenbelt areas for shelter; forage, and protection from nearby predator populations. However, the proximity of moose to people poses unique hazards: a motor vehicle colliding a moose may cause significant injury and vehicle damage. The annual Moose Vehicle Collision (MVC) rate increased during the study period from 40 to 52 MVCs per 100,000 registered vehicles in Anchorage, a significant (X-2 = 7.8, p < 0.01) increase of 23%. Of 519 reported MVCs, 23% resulted in injury to 158 people, with no human fatalities. Collisions were 2.6 times more Likely to have occurred in the dark (n = 375, [72%]) than during daylight hours. An MVC on a dry road was twice (95% CI: 1.29, 3.08) as likely to have resulted in an injury as an incident on a slick road. MVCs may be prevented by: reducing speed limits around greenbelt areas, brighter vehicle headlights, placement of street lights in known moose areas, underpasses for wildlife at known crossings, and snow removal to reduce berm height in areas of high moose concentrations.
Keywords
Injuries; Injury-prevention; Statistical-analysis; Accident-statistics; Accident-analysis; Drivers; Animals; Forestry
Contact
GA Conway, NIOSH, Alaska Field Stn, Div Safety Res, Center for Disease Control & Prevention, 4230 Univ Dr, Suite 310, Anchorage, AK 99508
CODEN
JSFRAV
Publication Date
19991201
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
2000
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0022-4375
NIOSH Division
DSR
Source Name
Journal of Safety Research
State
AK
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