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Selective early cardiolipin peroxidation after traumatic brain injury: an oxidative lipidomics analysis.

Authors
Bayir-H; Tyurin-VA; Tyurina-YY; Viner-R; Ritov-V; Amoscato-AA; Zhao-Q; Zhang-XJ; Janesko-Feldman-KL; Alexander-H; Basova-LV; Clark-RS; Kochanek-PM; Kagan-VE
Source
Ann Neurol 2007 Aug; 62(2):154-169
NIOSHTIC No.
20032817
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Enhanced lipid peroxidation is well established in traumatic brain injury. However, its molecular targets, identity of peroxidized phospholipid species, and their signaling role have not been deciphered. METHODS: Using controlled cortical impact as a model of traumatic brain injury, we employed a newly developed oxidative lipidomics approach to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the lipid peroxidation response. RESULTS: Electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis of rat cortical mitochondrial/synaptosomal fractions demonstrated the presence of highly oxidizable molecular species containing C(22:6) fatty acid residues in all major classes of phospholipids. However, the pattern of phospholipid oxidation at 3 hours after injury displayed a nonrandom character independent of abundance of oxidizable species and included only one mitochondria-specific phospholipid, cardiolipin (CL). This selective CL peroxidation was followed at 24 hours by peroxidation of other phospholipids, most prominently phosphatidylserine, but also phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. CL oxidation preceded appearance of biomarkers of apoptosis (caspase-3 activation, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positivity) and oxidative stress (loss of glutathione and ascorbate). INTERPRETATION: The temporal sequence combined with the recently demonstrated role of CL hydroperoxides (CL-OOH) in in vitro models of apoptosis suggest that CL-OOH may be both a key in vivo trigger of apoptotic cell death and a therapeutic target in experimental traumatic brain injury.
Keywords
Cell-biology; Cell-alteration; Cell-differentiation; Cell-function; Cell-morphology; Metabolism; Physiology; Traumatic-injuries; Brain-damage; Qualitative-analysis; Quantitative-analysis; Fatty-acids; Cell-damage; Cellular-reactions; Cardiac-function; Oxidation
Contact
Dr Bayir, 3434 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
CODEN
ANNED3
Publication Date
20070801
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2007
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-008282
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0364-5134
Source Name
Annals of Neurology
State
PA
Performing Organization
University of Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh
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