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Longitudinal changes in pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in cotton textile workers: a 15-yr follow-up study.

Authors
Christiani-DC; Wang-XR; Pan-LD; Zhang-HX; Sung-BX; Dai-H; Eisen-EA; Wegman-DH; Olenchock-SA
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2001 Mar; 163(4):847-853
NIOSHTIC No.
20032173
Abstract
To evaluate the chronic effects of exposure to cotton dust, a 15-yr follow-up study in cotton textile workers was performed in Shanghai, China from 1981 to 1996. Testing occurred four times during the 15-yr period. The achieved follow-up rates were 76-88% of the original 447 cotton textile workers, and 70-85% of the original 472 silk textile workers (as a control group). Identical questionnaires, equipment, and methods were used throughout the study. The prevalence of byssinosis increased over time in cotton workers, with 15.3% at the last survey versus 7.6% at the baseline, whereas no byssinosis was found in silk workers. More workers in the cotton group consistently reported symptoms than in the silk group, although symptom reporting varied considerably from survey to survey. Cotton workers had small, but significantly greater, adjusted annual declines in FEV1 and FVC than did the silk workers. Years worked in cotton mills, high level of exposure to endotoxin, and across-shift drops in FEV1 were found to be significant determinants for longitudinal change in FEV1, after controlling for appropriate confounders. Furthermore, there were statistically significant associations between excessive loss of FEV1 and byssinosis, chest tightness at work, and chronic bronchitis in cotton workers. Workers who consistently (three or four of the surveys) reported byssinosis or chest tightness at work had a significantly greater 15-yr loss of FEV1. We conclude that long-term exposure to cotton dust is associated with chronic or permanent obstructive impairments. Consistent reporting of respiratory symptoms, including byssinosis and chest tightness at work is of value to predict the magnitude and severity of chronic impairments in textile workers.
Keywords
Cotton-dust; Cotton-industry; Cotton-mill-workers; Cotton-fibers; Textile-finishing; Textile-mills; Textile-workers; Textiles; Textiles-industry; Respiratory-system-disorders; Respiratory-irritants; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Endotoxins; Chronic-degenerative-diseases
Contact
Dr. David Christiani, Occupational Health Program, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115
CODEN
AJCMED
Publication Date
20010301
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
dchris@hohp.harvard.edu
Funding Amount
1348724
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2001
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-002421
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
1073-449X
NIOSH Division
OD
Source Name
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
State
MA; WV
Performing Organization
Harvard University
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