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Suppression of phagocytic and bactericidal functions of rat alveolar macrophages by the organic component of diesel exhaust particles.

Authors
Yin-XJ; Dong-CC; Ma-JYC; Roberts-JR; Antonini-JM; Ma-JKH
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health, A 2007 May; 70(10):820-828
NIOSHTIC No.
20031865
Abstract
Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) was shown to increase the susceptibility of the lung to bacterial infection in rats. In this study, the effects of DEP on alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytic and bactericidal functions and cytokine secretion by AM and lymphocytes in response to Listeria monocytogenes infection were investigated in vitro and the roles of different DEP components in these processes were compared. Exposure to DEP or the organic extracts of DEP (eDEP) significantly decreased the phagocytosis and killing of L. monocytogenes by AM obtained from normal rats. Washed DEP (wDEP) also decreased AM phagocytosis and bacterial killing to a lesser extent, whereas carbon black (CB) reduced AM phagocytosis but had no significant effect on AM bactericidal activity. DEP or eDEP concentration-dependently suppressed L. monocytogenes-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-12 by AM and of IL-2 and interferon- by lymphocytes obtained from L. monocytogenes-infected rats, but augmented the AM secretion of IL-10. wDEP or CB, however, exerted little or no effect on these L. monocytogenes-induced cytokines. These results provide direct evidence that DEP, through the actions of organic components, suppresses AM phagocytic and bactericidal functions in vitro. Inhibition of AM phagocytic function and alterations of AM and lymphocyte cytokine secretion by DEP and DEP organic compounds may be implicated in the diminished AM bactericidal activity and the lymphatic arm of the host immune system, thus resulting in an suppressed pulmonary clearance of L. monocytogenes and an increased susceptibility of the lung to bacterial infection.
Keywords
Animal-studies; Bacterial-dusts; Diesel-emissions; Lung-disease; Lung-disorders; Particulate-dust; Pulmonary-disorders; Pulmonary-function; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Antigens; Blood-cells; Blood-disorders; Immune-system-disorders
Contact
Xuejun J. Yin, MD, PhD, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, 1 Medical Center Drive, Morgantown, WV 26506-9203
CODEN
JTEHD6
Publication Date
20070515
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
xyin@hsc.wvu.edu
Fiscal Year
2007
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
1528-7394
NIOSH Division
HELD
Source Name
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues
State
WV
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