Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Is the apparent decrease in injury and illness rates in construction the result of changes in reporting?

Authors
Welch-LS; Dong-X; Carre-F; Ringen-K
Source
Int J Occup Environ Health 2007 Jan-Mar; 13(1):39-45
NIOSHTIC No.
20031828
Abstract
Injury rates in all industries and in construction in particular have been declining. Inconsistencies in the information suggest some of the apparent decrease may be due to changes in the ways injuries are treated, misclassification of employees, or underreporting. Lost-time injury rates for the largest construction employers declined by as much as 92% between 1988 and 1999. Yet the rate for cases with restricted work activity actually increased from 0.7 to 1.2 per 100 full-time workers between 1990 and 2000, and fatalities among construction workers remain high. In Massachusetts, at least 14% of construction employers misclassified workers as independent contractors, with the effect that injuries to these workers are not recordable. Studies that compare OSHA logs with other data sources find that the OSHA logs do not include a significant proportion of injuries and illnesses identified elsewhere.
Keywords
Construction; Construction-materials; Construction-workers; Injuries; Injury-prevention; Epidemiology; Surveillance-programs; Tools; Statistical-analysis
Contact
Laura S. Welch, MD, Center to Protect Workers' Rights, 8484 Georgia Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910
CODEN
IOEHFU
Publication Date
20070101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
lwelch@cpwr.com
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement; Construction
Fiscal Year
2007
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U54-OH-008307
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
1077-3525
Priority Area
Construction
Source Name
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health
State
MD
Performing Organization
Center to Protect Workers' Rights
TOP