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A theoretical framework for evaluating analytical digestion methods for poorly soluble particulate beryllium.

Authors
Stefaniak-AB; Brink-CA; Dickerson-RM; Day-GA; Brisson-MJ; Hoover-MD; Scripsick-RC
Source
Anal Bioanal Chem 2007 Apr; 87(7):2411-2417
NIOSHTIC No.
20031816
Abstract
Complete digestion of all chemical forms and sizes of particulate analytes in environmental samples is usually necessary to obtain accurate results with atomic spectroscopy. In the current study, we investigate the physicochemical properties of beryllium particles likely to be encountered in samples collected from different occupational environments and present a hypothesis that a dissolution theory can be used as a conceptual framework to guide development of strategies for digestion procedures. For monodisperse single-chemical constituent primary particles, such as those encountered when handling some types of beryllium oxide (BeO) powder, theory predicts that a digestion procedure is sufficient when it completely dissolves all primary particles, independent of cluster size. For polydisperse single-chemical constituent particles, such as those encountered during the handling of some types of beryllium metal powder, theory predicts that a digestion procedure is sufficient only when it completely dissolves the largest particle in the sample. For samples with unknown or multi-chemical constituent particles and with particles having undefined sizes, e.g., fume emissions from a copper-beryllium alloy furnace operation or dust from a beryl ore crushing operation, a surface area-limited and single-constituent-dependent dissolution theory may not predict complete dissolution, thereby requiring non-routine robust treatment procedures with post-digestion filtration, followed by examination of residual particulate material. Additionally, for beryllium, and likely other poorly soluble materials, particulate reference materials of various chemical forms and size distributions are needed to better evaluate and harmonize analytical digestion procedures.
Keywords
Physiological-chemistry; Physiological-testing; Physiological-measurements; Particle-counters; Particulate-sampling-methods; Particulates; Chemical-kinetics; Chemical-properties; Chemical-synthesis; Work-environment; Work-areas; Work-analysis; Work-performance; Fumes; Biochemical-analysis; Biochemical-indicators; Biochemistry
Contact
AB Stefaniak, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
CODEN
ABCNBP
CAS No.
7440-41-7
Publication Date
20070401
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
AStefaniak@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2007
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
1618-2642
NIOSH Division
DRDS
Source Name
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
State
WV; NM; SC
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