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Applying the health promotion model to development of a worksite intervention.

Authors
Lusk-SL; Kerr-MJ; Ronis-DL; Eakin-BL
Source
Am J Health Promot 1999 Mar; 13(4):219-227
NIOSHTIC No.
20031296
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Consistent use of hearing protection devices (HPDs) decreases noise-induced hearing loss, however, many workers do not use them consistently. Past research has supported the need to use a conceptual framework to understand behaviors and guide intervention programs; however, few reports have specified a process to translate a conceptual model into an intervention. PURPOSE: The strongest predictors from the Health Promotion Model were used to design a training program to increase HPD use among construction workers. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Carpenters (n = 118), operating engineers (n = 109), and plumber/pipefitters (n = 129) in the Midwest were recruited to participate in the study. DESIGN: Written questionnaires including scales measuring the components of the Health Promotion Model were completed in classroom settings at worker trade group meetings. MEASURES: All items from scales predicting HPD use were reviewed to determine the basis for the content of a program to promote the use of HPDs. Three selection criteria were developed: (1) correlation with use of hearing protection (at least .20), (2) amenability to change, and (3) room for improvement (mean score not at ceiling). RESULTS: Linear regression and Pearson's correlation were used to assess the components of the model as predictors of HPD use. Five predictors had statistically significant regression coefficients: perceived noise exposure, self-efficacy, value of use, barriers to use, and modeling of use of hearing protection. Using items meeting the selection criteria, a 20-minute videotape with written handouts was developed as the core of an intervention. A clearly defined practice session was also incorporated in the training intervention. CONCLUSION: Determining salient factors for worker populations and specific protective equipment prior to designing an intervention is essential. These predictors provided the basis for a training program that addressed the specific needs of construction workers. Results of tests of the effectiveness of the program will be available in the near future.
Keywords
Models; Hearing-protection; Noise; Noise-control; Noise-protection; Training; Protective-equipment; Construction-equipment; Construction-workers; Author Keywords: Health Promotion Model; Worksite Intervention; Predictor-Based Training; Hearing Protector Use; Predictors of Behavior
Contact
University of Michigan School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 3182, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0482
CODEN
AJHPED
Publication Date
19990301
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
683954
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1999
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003136
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0890-1171
Priority Area
Noise-induced-hearing-loss
Source Name
American Journal of Health Promotion
State
MI
Performing Organization
University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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