Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Strength capabilities and subjective limits in repetitive manual exertions: task and hand dominance effects.

Authors
Johnson-H; Nussbaum-MA
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J 2003 Nov/Dec; 64(6):763-770
NIOSHTIC No.
20031236
Abstract
Strength and subjectively determined exertion limits are used widely for ergonomic evaluation. Although compilations of such data for the hand and finger exist, several important limitations include the use of inexperienced participants and constrained postures. In this study both strength and maximum acceptable limits (MAL, 2-hour duration) were obtained from both industrial workers and inexperienced volunteers in 10 simulated hand-intensive automotive assembly tasks. To expand the applicability of the results, the effects of hand-dominance were also determined. Results were compared with existing recommendations (by Kodak and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists threshold limit value for hand-intensive activities), and showed that across the diverse tasks the former yields values slightly below the 1st percentile of MAL, whereas the latter values are slightly higher than the 25th percentile. MALs were found to be approximately 50% of strength, consistent with earlier reports, and suggesting that acceptable limits are strongly influenced by physical capacity. Substantial differences ( approximately 30%) in strength and MALs were found between the two participant groups, emphasizing that participants should resemble the target population. Hand-dominance effects were statistically significant though of moderate size ( approximately 5%). Strength and MAL distributions are provided that can be used for evaluation and design of a variety of hand-intensive occupational tasks.
Keywords
Repetitive-work; Workers; Worker-health; Ergonomics; Posture; Statistical-analysis; Occupational-health
Contact
Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, 250 Durham Hall (0118), Blacksburg, VA 24061
CODEN
AIHAAP
Publication Date
20031101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
nussbaum@vt.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2004
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T01-OH-008613
Issue of Publication
6
ISSN
0002-8894
Source Name
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal
State
VA
Performing Organization
Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, Virginia
TOP