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Occupational skin disease.

Authors
Peate-WF
Source
Am Fam Phys 2002 Sep; 66(6):1025-1032
NIOSHTIC No.
20031197
Abstract
Contact dermatitis, the most common occupational skin disease, is characterized by clearly demarcated areas of rash at sites of exposure. The rash improves on removal of the offending agent. In allergic contact dermatitis, even minute exposures to antigenic substances can lead to a skin rash. Common sensitizing agents include nickel and members of the Rhus genus (e.g., poison ivy, poison oak). Severe skin irritants tend to cause immediate red blisters or burns, whereas weaker irritants produce eczematous skin changes over time. An occupational cause should be suspected when rash occurs in areas that are in contact with oil, grease, or other substances. Direct skin testing (patch or scratch) or radioallergosorbent testing may help to identify a specific trigger. Skin cancer can have an occupational link in workers with prolonged exposure to sunlight and certain chemicals, although it can take decades for lesions to develop. In workers with occupational skin disease, workplace changes and protective measures are important to prevent future exposure.
Keywords
Occupational-diseases; Occupational-hazards; Skin-diseases; Contact-dermatitis; Dermatosis; Dermatitis; Allergic-dermatitis; Occupational-exposure; Skin-disorders; Skin-irritants; Skin-tests; Workers; Worker-health
CODEN
AFPYAE
Publication Date
20020915
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
peate@u.arizona.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2002
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T01-CCT-910446
Issue of Publication
6
ISSN
0002-838X
Source Name
American Family Physician
State
AZ
Performing Organization
University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
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