Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

The evidence that non-ionizing radiation alters men's hormone levels by W. James [reply to letter to the editor].

Authors
Grajewski-B; Cox-C; Shrader-SM; Murray-WE; Edwards-RM; Turner-TW; Smith-JM; Simon-SD; Conover-DL
Source
J Occup Environ Med 2002 Apr; 44(4):307
NIOSHTIC No.
20030947
Abstract
Dr James' summaries of occupational associations with lowered sex ratios and the health effects of nonionizing radiation, and the hypothesis that change in a ratio of parental hormones will change the probability of a child's gender, are of interest. Our study could not address these questions inasmuch as it examined only potential hormonal and semen quality effects from specific occupational exposure to 3- to 100-MHz radio-frequency radiation. Our findings may not be generalizable to the effects of nonionizing radiation exposure at other frequencies. We agree with Dr James' recommendation that further work to determine the effects of nonionizing radiation on reproductive endpoints should take place in occupationally exposed groups. Successful additional research in this area is likely to be limited to study designs in occupational groups that possess adequate statistical power, definitive exposure metrics, adequate exposure assessment, control or adequate measurement of potential confounders and effect modifiers, and selection of sensitive, interpretable, and standardized reproductive outcomes. Studies based on very rare outcomes or very common outcomes (eg, altered sex ratio) require very large numbers of study participants to attain adequate statistical power, especially when control for potential confounders and effect modifiers is considered. This is difficult in occupational groups, which are often limited in size. The most effective measures of reproductive health for these studies may be sperm concentration, motility, and structure, hormonal measures of the reproductive profile in men, and hormonal measures of ovulatory function in women.
Keywords
Radiation; Men; Hormones; Hormone-activity; Occupational-exposure; Radiation-exposure; Radiation-effects; Sexual-reproduction
CODEN
JOEMFM
Publication Date
20020401
Document Type
Other
Fiscal Year
2002
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
1076-2752
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Priority Area
Disease and Injury: Fertility and Pregnancy Abnormalities
Source Name
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
OH
TOP