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Surface haulage accidents - causes and cures.

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Institute on Coal Mining Health, Safety and Research, Blacksburg, Virginia, August 25-27, 1981. Karmis M, Sutherland WH, Lucas JR, Patrick JL, eds., Blacksburg, VA: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1981 Aug; :107-110
The Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor statistics recently reported that mining employs a little less than 1 percent of our country's workers, yet it accounts for over 8 percent of all industrial deaths. The social and productivity costs of mine accidents require industry and government to work toward improving this situation. The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Mines and the Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) have been active in this area for a number of years. Mine safety hazards can be classified in several ways. One way is to look at accidents from a geographical point of view, and MSHA does make this breakdown in its quarterly and annual reports. Another way is to break the problem down into commodities produced, which is also done by MSHA. For the purpose of relating accident statistics to research needs, I have dissected accident information by mining activity. I have done this in order to understand what the miner was doing when he was hurt. Knowing this, one can search for improved procedures or equipment to reduce the danger of the activity. Thus, when I talk of mine safety, I will not talk of geographical (i.e., State-by-State) problems, or commodity (i.e., coal versus noncoal) problems, but I will discuss problems--and possible solutions that cut across the entire mining industry. Also, the discussion will concentrate on overall accident information rather than just fatality figures. This is because a larger sample size is obtained when analyzing an accident classification rather than individual fatalities which are often site specific.
Mineral-processing; Mining-industry; Coal-mining; Longwall-mining; Underground-mining; Room-and-pillar-mining; Injury-prevention; Safety-education; Safety-monitoring; Health-protection; Mine-workers; Miners; Coal-workers; Protective-measures; Accident-prevention; Accident-rates; Traumatic-injuries; Mortality-rates
Publication Date
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Karmis-M; Sutherland-WH; Lucas-JR; Patrick-JL
Fiscal Year
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
Source Name
Proceedings of the 12th Annual Institute on Coal Mining Health, Safety and Research, Blacksburg, Virginia, August 25-27, 1981