Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Fingertip loading and carpal tunnel pressure: differences between a pinching and a pressing task.

Authors
Keir-PJ; Bach-JM; Rempel-DM
Source
J Orthop Res 1998 Jan; 16(1):112-115
NIOSHTIC No.
20030562
Abstract
Carpal tunnel syndrome may be caused by repeated or sustained elevated carpal tunnel pressure. This study examined the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, posture, and fingertip load. In 20 healthy individuals, carpal tunnel pressure was measured with a catheter inserted into the carpal tunnel of the dominant hand and connected to a pressure transducer. With the wrist in a pressure-neutral position, the subjects pressed on a force transducer with the index finger to levels of 0, 5, 10, and 15 N. They then pinched the transducer at the same levels of force. For both fingertip-loading postures, the carpal tunnel pressure increased with increasing fingertip load. Carpal tunnel pressures were significantly greater (p < 0.015) for the pinching task (14.2, 29.9, 41.9, and 49.7 mm Hg [1.89, 3.99, 5.59, and 6.63 kPa] for 0, 5, 10, and 15 N force levels, respectively) than for simple finger pressing (7.8, 14.1, 20.0, and 33.8 mm Hg [1.04, 1.88, 2.67, and 4.51 kPa]). This study indicates that although the external load on the finger remained constant between the two tasks, the internal loading, as measured by carpal tunnel pressure, experienced a near 2-fold increase by using a pinch grip. These findings should be given consideration in designing work tasks and tools because relatively low fingertip forces, especially in a pinch grip, elevate carpal tunnel pressures to levels that, if prolonged, may lead to the development or exacerbation of carpal tunnel syndrome.
Keywords
Carpal-tunnel-syndrome; Hand-injuries; Posture; Etiology; Men; Women; Cumulative-trauma; Cumulative-trauma-disorders; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Neuromuscular-system-disorders
Contact
David M. Rempel, University of California. San Francisco. Ergonomics Program. 1301 South 46th Street. Building 112. Richmond. CA 94804. U.S.A.
CODEN
JOREDR
Publication Date
19980101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
rempel@its&ucsf.edu
Funding Amount
162000
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1998
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-K01-OH-000121
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0736-0266
Source Name
Journal of Orthopaedic Research
State
CA
Performing Organization
Division of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, Richmond, California
TOP