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Nail gun injuries in apprentice carpenters: risk factors and control measures.

Authors
Lipscomb-HJ; Dement-JM; Nolan-J; Patterson-D
Source
Am J Ind Med 2006 Jul; 49(7):505-513
NIOSHTIC No.
20030532
Abstract
Background Nail guns increase residential construction productivity but their use is associated with risk of injury. Methods Active surveillance data from 772 apprentice carpenters were used to document the injury risk associated with the use of nail guns and the potential impact of modifiable risk factors. Using reported work hours and nail gun injuries injury rates per 200,000 hr worked in the past year were calculated. Using estimates of hours of tool use, Poisson regression was used to calculate adjusted rate ratios for injury associated with time in the trade, trigger mechanism on the tools and training prior to injury. Results Forty-five percent of these apprentices had sustained a nail gun injury; injury rates in the past year based on hours of work were considerably higher than previously recognized. Those with less than 1 year in the trade compared to those with more than 5 years experience (RR = 2.7; 95% CI 1.2, 5.9) and those with no training in tool use (RR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.9, 4.4) were at greatest risk. After adjusting for experience and training, the rate of injury was twice as high with tools with a contact trip trigger compared to those with a sequential trigger (RR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.2, 3.3). Conclusions Preventive measures should include change to the safer sequential trigger that prevents unintentional firing and early training in safe tool use. Because of the high prevalence of use of tools with contact trip triggers the greatest number of injuries among these apprentices could be prevented with an engineering solution.
Keywords
Construction; Construction-materials; Construction-workers; Injuries; Pneumatic-tools; Injury-prevention; Epidemiology; Surveillance-programs; Talcosis; Tools; Statistical-analysis; Training
Contact
Department of Community and Family Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Box 3834, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
20060701
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
hester.lipscomb@duke.edu
Funding Type
Construction; Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2006
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U54-OH-008307
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
0271-3586
Priority Area
Construction
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
NC; MO; MD
Performing Organization
Center to Protect Workers' Rights
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