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Occupational health needs assessment among tribes in New Mexico.

Authors
Mulloy-KB; Moraga-Mchaley-S; Flowers-L
Source
2005 Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists Annual Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, June 5-9, 2005. Atlanta, GA: Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, 2005 Jun; :1-2
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20030479
Abstract
Native Americans and their business enterprises are major components of the New Mexican economy. According to the 1997 Minority and Women-owned Business Survey, US Census Bureau, 7,000 businesses in New Mexico are owned by tribal membersi. According to analysis of US Census Bureauii industry and occupational employment data over 4,000 Native American males were employed in the construction industry'in 2000 making construction the number one employer of this population. Construction is also one of the top industries for occupational-injury mortality among Native Americans in NM. The Arts, Entertainment and Recreation industry is also a major employer of Native Americans in New Mexico, with several tribes having over 15% of their enrolled membership employed in the industry and is consistently in the top 10 for non-fatal occupational illness and injury in New Mexico from 1999-2002. In an effort to increase the knowledge base of occupational illness and injury of New Mexico's Native American populations and of establishing viable working relationships with tribal entities, the New Mexico Occupational Health Registry conducted an occupational health needs assessment. The presentation plans to: summarize methods applied to conduct the needs assessment project, including the forging of collaborations and partnerships with sovereign tribal entities, discusses the results of a survey distributed to health and safety professionals working with tribes, provide conclusions and recommendations on the needs assessment approach for building coalitions for occupational health surveillance, and describe possible avenues for intervention for prevention among Native American communities.
Keywords
Work-environment; Work-operations; Work-performance; Work-practices; Worker-health; Workplace-monitoring; Workplace-studies; Occupational-accidents; Occupational-diseases; Occupational-health; Occupational-health-programs; Occupational-health-services; Injuries; Injury-prevention; Surveillance-programs; Statistical-analysis
Contact
MSC10 5550, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
Publication Date
20050605
Document Type
Abstract
Email Address
kmulloy@salud.unm.edu
Funding Amount
324892
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2005
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U53-OH-008339
Priority Area
Research Tools and Approaches: Surveillance Research Methods
Source Name
2005 Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists Annual Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, June 5-9,2005
State
NM
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