Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

An updated physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for hexachlorobenzene: incorporation of pathophysiological states following partial hepatectomy and hexachlorobenzene treatment.

Authors
Lu-Y; Lohitnavy-M; Reddy-MB; Lohitnavy-O; Ashley-A; Yang-RS
Source
Toxicol Sci 2006 May; 91(1):29-41
NIOSHTIC No.
20030410
Abstract
Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is generally used for describing xenobiotic disposition in animals and humans with normal physiological conditions. We describe here an updated PBPK model for hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in male F344 rats with the incorporation of pathophysiological conditions. Two more features contribute to the distinctness of this model from the earlier published versions. This model took erythrocyte binding into account, and a particular elimination process of HCB, the plasma-to-gastrointestinal (GI) lumen passive diffusion (i.e., exsorption), was incorporated. Our PBPK model was developed using data mined from multiple pharmacokinetic studies in the literature, and then modified to simulate HCB disposition under the conditions of our integrated pharmacokinetics/liver foci bioassay. This model included plasma, erythrocytes, liver, fat, rapidly and slowly perfused compartments, and GI lumen. To account for the distinct characteristics of HCB absorption, the GI lumen was split into an upper and a lower part. HCB was eliminated through liver metabolism and the exsorption process. The pathophysiological changes after partial hepatectomy, such as alterations in the liver and body weights and fat volume, were incorporated in our model. With adjustment of the transluminal diffusion-related parameters, the model adequately described the data from the literature and our bioassay. Our PBPK model simulation suggests that HCB absorption and exsorption processes depend on exposure conditions; different exposure conditions dictate different absorption and exsorption rates. This model forms a foundation for our further exploration of the quantitative relationship between HCB exposure and development of preneoplastic liver foci.
Keywords
Models; Physiology; Physiological-testing; Physiological-effects; Physiological-factors; Laboratory-animals; Animals; Animal-studies; Liver; Absorption-rates; Exposure-assessment
CODEN
TOSCF2
CAS No.
118-74-1
Publication Date
20060501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
raymond.yang@colostate.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2006
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-007556
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
1096-6080
Source Name
Toxicological Sciences
State
CO; CA
Performing Organization
Colorado State University - Fort Collins
TOP