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Sound-induced priming of the chinchilla auditory system.

Authors
Hamernik-RP; Ahroon-WA
Source
Hear Res 1999 Nov; 137(1-2):127-136
NIOSHTIC No.
20029998
Abstract
Exposure of the auditory system to either continuous or interrupted nontraumatic noises, often collectively referred to as priming exposures, has been shown, in a number of experimental paradigms, to reduce the susceptibility of the auditory system to noise-induced hearing and sensory cell loss from a subsequent traumatic exposure. Using auditory evoked potentials to obtain pure-tone thresholds and cochleograms to quantify sensory cell losses, the issue of priming-induced protective effects was examined in the chinchilla. Priming was accomplished with either a continuous noise or with a continuous noise followed by an interrupted noise. Trauma was induced by exposure to high-level impacts over a 5-day period that resulted in an asymptotic threshold shift. A comparison of the two groups of primed subjects with an unprimed control group showed that there were some statistically significant reductions in the asymptotic response of the primed groups to the traumatic exposure but no differences in permanent changes in thresholds among the three groups 30 days following the traumatic exposure. There were, however, some statistically significant, frequency-specific, reductions in outer hair cell loss in the primed groups. When conditioning was followed by the interrupted exposure that produced a threshold shift toughening effect, the conditioning protocol had no effect on the response of subjects to the interrupted exposure. There were also no differences in thresholds or sensory cell loss between the two primed groups 30 days post-trauma. Priming protocols may have different effects on the development of noise-induced trauma that are dependent on the nature of the traumatic stimulus, that is, long-term high-level impact noise exposure versus acute continuous noise exposure.
Keywords
Noise-induced-hearing-loss; Animal-studies; Cell-damage; Noise-exposure; Ear-disorders; Industrial-noise; Impulse-noise; Hearing-loss; Ear-disorders; Hearing; Hearing-disorders; Hearing-impairment; Hearing-threshold; Auditory-system; Auditory-nerve
Contact
Auditory Research Laboratory, Plattsburgh State University of New York, 107 Beaumont Hall, Plattsburgh, NY 12901-2681
CODEN
HERED3
Publication Date
19991101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
roger.hamernik@plattsburgh.edu
Funding Amount
2829511
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2000
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-02317
Issue of Publication
1-2
ISSN
0378-5955
Source Name
Hearing Research
State
NY
Performing Organization
Communicative Disorders & Scis Research Foundation of Suny P O Box 9 Albany, N Y 12201
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