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Worker recovery expectations and fear-avoidance predict work disability in a population-based workers' compensation back pain sample.

Authors
Turner-JA; Franklin-G; Fulton-Kehoe-D; Sheppard-L; Wickizer-TM; Wu-R; Gluck-JV; Egan-K
Source
Spine 2006 Mar; 31(6):682-689
NIOSHTIC No.
20029771
Abstract
Prospective, population-based cohort study. To examine whether worker demographic, pain, disability, and psychosocial variables, assessed soon after work-related back pain disability onset, predict 6-month work disability. Greater age, pain, and physical disability, and certain psychosocial characteristics may be risk factors for prolonged back pain-related work disability, although many studies have been small, findings have been inconsistent, and some psychosocial variables have not been examined prospectively. Workers (N = 1,068) completed telephone interviews assessing demographic, pain, disability, and psychosocial variables 18 days (median) after submitting Workers' Compensation back pain disability claims. Administrative measures of work disability 6 months after claim submission were obtained. At 6 months, 196 workers (18.4%) were receiving work disability compensation. Age, race, education, and baseline pain and disability were significant predictors of 6-month disability. Adjusting for baseline demographics, pain, disability, and other psychosocial variables, high work fear-avoidance (odds ratio, 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-13.7) and very low recovery expectations (odds ratio, 3.1, 95% confidence interval, 1.5-6.5) were significant independent predictors. Among individuals with acute work-related back pain, high pain and disability, low recovery expectations, and fears that work may increase pain or cause harm are risk factors for chronic work disability.
Keywords
Workers; Worker-health; Disabled-workers; Injuries; Traumatic-injuries; Back-injuries; Risk-analysis; Risk-factors; Demographic-characteristics; Age-factors; Racial-factors; Sex-factors
CODEN
SPINDD
Publication Date
20060315
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
jturner@u.washington.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2006
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-004069
Issue of Publication
6
ISSN
0362-2436
Source Name
Spine
State
WA
Performing Organization
University of Washington
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