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Injuries to volunteer fire fighters in West Virginia.

Authors
Magnetti-SM; Wyant-W; Greenwood-J; Roder-N; Linton-J; Ducatman-AM
Source
J Occup Environ Med 1999 Feb; 41(2):104-110
NIOSHTIC No.
20029642
Abstract
The distribution and characteristics of workplace injuries for West Virginia volunteer fire fighters (VFFs) are described using 1992 workers' compensation data. Most of the injuries occurred in VFFs who were less than 30 years of age (62%). The most common type of injuries were those in the category of lacerations and contusions (28.9%), with a notable percentage of injuries due to smoke inhalation and respiratory problems (13.7%). The proportional rates related to falls in VFFs were almost twice the national figures for the same year (39.3% versus 22.3%). County population density was found to be directly associated with injury rates, even when adjusted for number of responses. Claims statistics mirror a similar geographical trend in overall workers' compensation claims for all injuries in West Virginia. The results of this study provide a foundation for additional follow-up studies in order to develop improved occupational safety policies and target educational programs aimed at the prevention of injuries in volunteer fire fighters. Several findings have already resulted in programmatic recommendations.
Keywords
Injuries; Fire-fighting; Fire-fighters; Demographic-characteristics; Age-factors; Occupational-hazards; Smoke-inhalation; Respiratory-system-disorders; Statistical-analysis; Occupational-safety-programs; Safety-education; Injury-prevention
CODEN
JOEMFM
Publication Date
19990201
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1999
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T01-CCT-310455
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1076-2752
Source Name
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
WV
Performing Organization
West Virginia University, School of Medicine, Institute of Occupational and Environmental Health, Morgantown, West Virginia
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