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Measures of airways inflammation in occupants of a water-damaged office building.

Authors
Akpinar-Elci-M; Siegel-P; Cox-Ganser-J; Stemple-KJ; Hilsbos-K; Weissman-DN
Source
Proc Am Thorac Soc 2005 May; 2(Abstracts):A817
NIOSHTIC No.
20029556
Abstract
Rationale: The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health received a request to evaluate of an office building where approximately 1,300 people work. Workers reported respiratory conditions that they perceived to be building-related. We hypothesized that these symptoms might be associated with airways inflammation. To test this hypothesis, we assessed airways inflammation in employees using exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) and investigated associations with symptoms. Methods: In September 2001, a health screening questionnaire was offered to all employees. The September questionnaire identified 356 employees who met either an epidemiological case definition for lower respiratory illness (n = 202) or a comparison group definition (n = 154). In June 2002, those 356 employees were offered a more detailed health questionnaire, spirometry, methacholine challenge test, skin prick test, EBC and ENO. A total of 233 participants (65.5%) subsequently completed either EBC or ENO testing. Results: The mean age of participants was 46.5 8.3; 62.2 % were female and 12.0 % were current smokers. In a smoking-adjusted multivariate analysis, ENO level was significantly higher among those with hay fever, runny nose, restrictive spirometry, and atopy; and significantly lower in chronic bronchitis. EBC nitrite was significantly higher among those with cough. EBC IL-8 was also higher with cough, as well as chronic bronchitis. Both ENO and EBC IL-8 were higher in those with symptoms not related to work, but no differences were noted between those with and without symptoms related to work. Conclusion: Our findings did not support the hypothesis that building-related symptoms were associated with airways inflammation, as assessed by ENO and EBC.
Keywords
Pulmonary-system-disorders; Respiratory-system-disorders; Respiratory-irritants; Epidemiology; Statistical-analysis; Indoor-air-pollution; Humans; Questionnaires; Indoor-environmental-quality
CODEN
PATSBB
Publication Date
20050520
Document Type
Abstract; Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Fiscal Year
2005
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
Abstracts
ISSN
1546-3222
NIOSH Division
DRDS; HELD
Source Name
Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society. 2005 ATS International Conference, May 20-25, 2005, San Diego, California
State
WV; CA; NY
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