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A longitudinal observation of early pulmonary responses to cotton dust.

Authors
Wang-XR; Pan-LD; Zhang-HX; Sun-BX; Dai-HL; Christiani-DC
Source
Occup Environ Med 2003 Feb; 60(2):115-121
NIOSHTIC No.
20029262
Abstract
To examine early adverse pulmonary effects of exposure to cotton dust, and to identify potential risk factors, including atopy for pulmonary responses to cotton dust. Spirometry, methacholine challenge testing, and questionnaire; performed among 101 non-smoking newly hired textile workers at baseline (prior to starting work), and at 3, 12, and 18 months after starting work. Concentrations of airborne cotton dust in various work areas were measured at each follow up survey using vertical elutriators. The incidence of non-specific respiratory symptoms was 8% at three months, then diminished afterwards. Substantial acute cross shift drops in FEV(1) at each follow up survey, and longitudinal declines in FVC and FEV(1) after 12 months of exposure were observed. Airway responsiveness to methacholine increased with follow up time, and was more pronounced among atopics. Increasing airway responsiveness was strongly correlated with cross shift drops in FEV(1). In addition, one or more respiratory symptoms at three months was significantly, and pre-existing atopy marginally significantly, associated with cross shift drops in FEV(1) after adjusting for other covariates and confounders. Results suggest that non-specific respiratory symptoms, decreasing lung function, and increasing airway responsiveness are early pulmonary responses to cotton dust. In addition, the occurrence of respiratory symptoms and increasing airway responsiveness, as well as atopy, may be important predictors for acute changes in lung function among cotton textile workers.
Keywords
Cotton-dust; Dusts; Dust-particles; Occupational-exposure; Risk-factors; Risk-analysis; Spirometry; Textile-workers; Workers; Airborne-dusts; Airborne-particles; Lung-function; Respiratory-system-disorders; Pulmonary-system-disorders
Contact
Dr D C Christiani, Occupational Health Program, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
CODEN
OEMEEM
Publication Date
20030201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
dchris@hohp.harvard.edu
Funding Amount
1348724
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-002421
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1351-0711
Source Name
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
MA
Performing Organization
Harvard University
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