Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Transferring behavioral technology across applications.

Authors
Newland-MC; Pennypacker-HS; Anger-WK; Mele-P
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol 2003 Sep-Oct; 25(5):529-542
NIOSHTIC No.
20029227
Abstract
Application flows naturally from good science, and behavioral toxicology is no exception. Phenomena discovered and procedures developed in behavioral laboratories are being applied on a wide scale in commercial, industrial, and governmental settings. In behavioral toxicology, this transfer of technology has occurred in an ad hoc manner, albeit with a degree of sophistication. The development of technology transfer in other disciplines is instructive. A symposium at the May 2001 meeting of the Behavioral Toxicology Society examined this issue, and some participants provide their contributions here. Henry Pennypacker examines the issue of whether behavioral procedures can meet the demanding standards required to transfer technology to commercial endeavors and concludes that, under some conditions, they can. He notes that the shortage of well-developed and transferred behavioral technologies results from a lack of understanding of the process of technology transfer on the part of behavior analysts. In the field of engineering, the results of basic research are transformed to candidate technologies that meet standardized criteria with respect to three properties: quantification, repetition, and verification. Kent Anger describes the challenging steps in the trail from the laboratory to wide-scale application-steps that are essential for the scaling up of any behavioral technique. Finally, Paul Mele describes the legal background to patenting and copyrighting ideas, a process that behaviorists have rarely used. Together, these topics identify the requirements and warn of the challenges and intricacies that await those who seek to transfer behavioral technology beyond the laboratory.
Keywords
Behavior; Behavioral-testing; Laboratory-techniques; Laboratory-testing; Humans; Animals; Animal-studies
Contact
Experimental Psychology, 226 Thach Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
CODEN
NETEEC
Publication Date
20030901
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
newlamc@auburn.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-004193
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0892-0362
Source Name
Neurotoxicology and Teratology
State
AL; FL; OR; MD
Performing Organization
Oregon Health & Science University
TOP