Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Effects of physician-related factors on adult asthma care, health status, and quality of life.

Authors
Blanc-PD; Trupin-L; Earnest-G; San Pedro-M; Katz-PP; Yelin-EH; Eisner-MD
Source
Am J Med 2003 May; 114(7):581-587
NIOSHTIC No.
20029148
Abstract
To study the association of physician characteristics, the characteristics of their practice settings, patient mix, and reported frequency of prescribing asthma medication with patients' health status and health-related quality of life in asthma. We conducted a mail-back survey of physicians (n = 147) that included demographic characteristics, practice and training characteristics, and reported prescribing frequencies for common asthma treatments. We also conducted structured telephone interviews with 317 of their patients, assessing demographic characteristics, health status (as measured by the Short Form-12 [SF-12] physical component score), and asthma-specific quality of life (as measured by the Marks questionnaire). In adjusted analyses, pulmonary specialists were more likely to report using leukotriene modifiers (odds ratio [OR] = 4.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2 to 18) and theophylline (OR = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.0 to 9.0) in adult patients with asthma. Working in a practice of >75% health maintenance organization (HMO)- or preferred provider organization (PPO)-insured patients was associated with a lower likelihood of prescribing leukotriene modifiers (OR = 0.1; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.5). Adjusting for patient demographic characteristics and steroid dependence, physician prescribing tendencies were not associated with patients' perceived health status or quality of life. Although an HMO- or PPO-predominant practice was associated with better physical health status (mean difference in SF-12 physical component score, 3.1; 95% CI: 0.05 to 6.2; P = 0.05), there was no statistical association with quality of life. The characteristics of physicians, their practices, and the asthma medication prescribing strategies that they adopt are not strongly associated with patients' perceived outcomes.
Keywords
Bronchial-asthma; Physicians; Health-care-personnel; Health-care; Medical-care; Medical-personnel; Demographic-characteristics; Training; Medical-treatment
Contact
Paul D. Blanc, MD, MSPH, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 609, Box 0924, , San Francisco, California, , USA 94117
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
20030501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
blancp@itsa.ucsf.edu
Funding Amount
372965
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003480
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
0271-3586
Priority Area
Research Tools and Approaches: Social and Economic Consequences
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
CA
Performing Organization
University of California, Cardiovascular Research Institute, San Francisco, California
TOP