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Chronic repetitive reaching and grasping results in decreased motor performance and widespread tissue responses in a rat model of MSD.

Authors
Barbe-MF; Barr-AE; Gorzelany-I; Amin-M; Gaughan-JP; Safadi-FF
Source
J Orthop Res 2003 Jan; 21(1):167-176
NIOSHTIC No.
20029137
Abstract
This study investigated changes in motor skills and tissues of the upper extremity (UE) with regard to injury and inflammatory reactions resulting from performance of a voluntary forelimb repetitive reaching and grasping task in rats. Rats reached for food at a rate of 4 reaches/min, 2 h/day, and 3 days/week for up to 8 weeks during which reach rate, task duration and movement strategies were observed. UE tissues were collected bilaterally at weekly time points of 3-8 weeks and examined for morphological changes. Serum was tested for levels of interleukin-1alpha (IL-1) protein. The macrophage-specific antibody, ED1, was used to identify infiltrating macrophages and the ED2 antibody was used to identify resident macrophages. Rats were unable to maintain baseline reach rate in weeks 5 and 6 of task performance. Alternative patterns of movement emerged. Fraying of tendon fibrils was observed after 6 weeks in the mid-forelimb. After 4 weeks, a general elevation of ED1-IR macrophages were seen in all tissues examined bilaterally including the contralateral, uninvolved forelimb and hindlimbs. Significantly more resident macrophages were seen at 6 and 8 weeks in the reach limb. At 8 weeks, serum levels of IL-1alpha increased significantly above week 0. Our results demonstrate that performance of repetitive tasks elicits motor decrements, signs of injury and a cellular and tissue responses associated with inflammation.
Keywords
Laboratory-animals; Animals; Animal-studies; Models; Injuries; Morphology; Repetitive-work; Cellular-reactions; Cumulative-trauma; Cumulative-trauma-disorders; Ergonomics
Contact
Department of Physical Therapy, College of Allied Health Professions, Temple University, 3307 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
CODEN
JOREDR
Publication Date
20030101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
mbarbe@temple.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003970
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0736-0266
Source Name
Journal of Orthopaedic Research
State
PA
Performing Organization
Temple University
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