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U.S. national control banding workshop and research agenda.

Authors
Niemeier-RW; Lentz-TJ
Source
IOHA 2005. 6th International Scientific Conference of the International Occupational Hygiene Association, 19-23 September, 2005, Pilanesberg National Park, North West Province, South Africa. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 2005 Sep; :129
NIOSHTIC No.
20029106
Abstract
With more than 17 million chemicals registered with the Chemical Abstract Services in world commerce, it is widely recognized that the Control Banding (CB) concept, which embeds sound scientific rationale, could revolutionize workplace health and safety in light of the limited number (about 1000) of resource intensive, OELs currently in use. This concept can be applied to a range of hazards including chemical, physical, biological, and ergonomic and is particularly useful in small and medium size enterprises. The concept provides a user-friendly, simple matrix of toxicology endpoints (risk bands) and material use (exposure bands) to determine which principle( s) in the hierarchy of controls can be used to provide guidance for controlling exposures to hazards (control bands). If adequately trained, people who have little or no occupational hygiene experience, like a small employer, can implement the hazard assessment process and understand the sound occupational hygiene advice in the form of control guidance sheets. The purpose of the U.S. National Control Banding Workshop was: 1) to present the concepts of CB to the wider occupational health and safety community; 2) to explore the feasibility of its application in the U.S.; 3) to produce a critical review of the literature; 4) to partner with industry, labor, academia and government to develop a national strategy to make the best use of this tool; and 5) to recommend actions and programs to facilitate the implementation of CB in the U.S. Inviting the participation of a smaller, targeted audience of about 50 influential stakeholders allowed more interactions and focused discussions to occur. Stakeholders included representatives from labor, business, academia, government, professional and trade associations, and industrial hygiene consultants. Discussions within the workgroups included strengths and weaknesses of the model and limitations to implementation in the U.S. Recommended actions and projects which could facilitate the adoption and implementation of CB in the U.S. were grouped into the following categories: 1) implementation of the model in the U.S.; 2) short term focus including validation considerations, expansion and dissemination of the model; 3) long term focus such as formulation of a system of incentives and addressing legal implications; and 4) national and international collaboration and coordination.
Keywords
Occupational-health; Occupational-hazards; Ergonomics; Hazards; Occupational-exposure; Control-methods; Models
Publication Date
20050919
Document Type
Abstract; Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Email Address
rwn1@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2005
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
EID
Source Name
IOHA 2005. 6th International Scientific Conference of the International Occupational Hygiene Association, 19-23 September, 2005, Pilanesberg National Park, North West Province, South Africa
State
OH
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