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Use of the North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks with Hmong farm families.

Authors
Rasmussen-RC; Schermann-MA; Shutske-JM; Olson-DK
Source
J Agric Saf Health 2003 Nov; 9(4):265-274
NIOSHTIC No.
20029080
Abstract
This literature review synthesizes available studies on Hmong agricultural practices, patterns of childhood growth and development of Hmong children in the context of injury prevention, and potential application or adaptation of the North American Guidelines for Children’s Agricultural Tasks (Lee and Marlenga, 1999) for Hmong children working in the U.S. Data from qualitative interviews, focus groups, case studies, and surveys were collected, categories were determined, and themes were identified. Field tools and practices, gender roles, and reasons for farming were examined, as well as physical and cognitive development of Hmong children and Hmong parenting techniques to describe factors related to farm task assignment of children. Current agricultural practices of Hmong in the U.S. can be described as generally small-scale operations that use mainly hand tools, manual labor, and local direct-marketing techniques. Specific practices include thinning, weeding, and hoeing; carrying tools, buckets, or baskets; setting plant supports; and watering. Hmong children appear to be given greater amounts of responsibility at earlier ages than North American children. Hmong parenting practices, as would be used in task assignment, are somewhat more authoritarian-based and lead to psychosocial skills that are more group-oriented than individual-oriented. Hmong children were found to be shorter than children in the U.S. of the same ages. This review suggests that the NAGCAT cannot be literally translated and disseminated to Hmong farming families as an injury prevention intervention. Further information is needed about what farm tasks Hmong children do and how Hmong parents assign those tasks to children.
Keywords
Racial-factors; Agricultural-workers; Agricultural-industry; Injuries; Injury-prevention; Accident-prevention; Accidents; Children; Work-practices; Behavior-patterns; Author Keywords: Agricultural; Cognitive; Development; Family; Farm; Growth; Hmong; Injury; Physical; Practices; Psychosocial; Safety
Contact
Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, University of Minnesota, 1390 Eckles Ave., St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
CODEN
JASHFD
Publication Date
20031101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
rasmu048@umn.edu
Funding Amount
590436
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2004
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-004215
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
1074-7583
Priority Area
Work Environment and Workforce: Special Populations
Source Name
Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health
State
MN
Performing Organization
University of Minnesota
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