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Association of in utero organophosphate pesticide exposure and fetal growth and length of gestation in an agricultural population.

Authors
Eskenazi-B; Harley-K; Bradman-A; Weltzien-E; Jewell-NP; Barr-DB; Furlong-CE; Holland-NT
Source
Environ Health Perspect 2004 Jul; 112(10):1116-1124
NIOSHTIC No.
20029058
Abstract
Although pesticide use is widespread, little is known about potential adverse health effects of in utero exposure. We investigated the effects of organophosphate pesticide exposure during pregnancy on fetal growth and gestational duration in a cohort of low-income, Latina women living in an agricultural community in the Salinas Valley, California. We measured nonspecific metabolites of organophosphate pesticides (dimethyl and diethyl phosphates) and metabolites specific to malathion (malathion dicarboxylic acid), chlorpyrifos [O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl) phosphoro-thioate], and parathion (4-nitrophenol) in maternal urine collected twice during pregnancy. We also measured levels of cholinesterase in whole blood and butyryl cholinesterase in plasma in maternal and umbilical cord blood. We failed to demonstrate an adverse relationship between fetal growth and any measure of in utero organophosphate pesticide exposure. In fact, we found increases in body length and head circumference associated with some exposure measures. However, we did find decreases in gestational duration associated with two measures of in utero pesticide exposure: urinary dimethyl phosphate metabolites [beta(adjusted) = -0.41 weeks per log10 unit increase; 95% confidence interval (CI), -0.75 -- -0.02; p = 0.02], which reflect exposure to dimethyl organophosphate compounds such as malathion, and umbilical cord cholinesterase (beta(adjusted) = 0.34 weeks per unit increase; 95% CI, 0.13-0.55; p = 0.001). Shortened gestational duration was most clearly related to increasing exposure levels in the latter part of pregnancy. These associations with gestational age may be biologically plausible given that organophosphate pesticides depress cholinesterase and acetylcholine stimulates contraction of the uterus. However, despite these observed associations, the rate of preterm delivery in this population (6.4%) was lower than in a U.S. reference population.
Keywords
Pesticides; Pregnancy; Children; Risk-factors; Risk-analysis; Exposure-levels; Exposure-assessment; Pesticides-and-agricultural-chemicals; Sampling-methods; Biological-monitoring; Prenatal-exposure; Health-hazards; Health-surveys; Blood-analysis; Blood-sampling; Urine-chemistry; Racial-factors
Contact
Center for Children's Environmental Health Research, School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, 94720-7380
CODEN
EVHPAZ
CAS No.
813-78-5; 598-02-7; 121-75-5; 2921-88-2; 56-38-2
Publication Date
20040701
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
eskenazi@uclink.berkeley.edu
Funding Amount
909365
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2004
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-007400
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
0091-6765
Source Name
Environmental Health Perspectives
State
CA; GA; WA
Performing Organization
University of California, Berkeley
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