Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Avoid the shock.

Authors
Homce-GT; Cawley-JC; Yenchek-MR
Source
Water Well J 2005 Aug; 59(8):12-14
NIOSHTIC No.
20028296
Abstract
Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics show that 89 water well drillers died on the job during 1992-2002. Twenty-eight of these deaths were electrocutions. Electrical accidents are the leading on-the-job killer of water well drillers. Nearly all of the 28 electrocutions occurred when drillers accidentally contacted overhead electrical power lines with tools or equipment. Therefore, it is very important that all water well drillers know how to recognize and avoid overhead power line hazards. Most overhead power lines are not insulated and often operate at several thousand volts or higher, so contact with any power line can kill you and your coworkers. Installing and repairing water pump systems can also be hazardous. Avoiding electrical injury while working on water well pump systems depends on several important factors, including hazard awareness, knowledge and experience, proper tools and equipment, meeting code requirements, and always following safe work procedures. First and foremost, electrical work should only be done by qualified personnel.
Keywords
Electrocutions; Electrical-safety; Electrical-hazards; Accidents; Electricity; Hazards; Electrical-shock; Safety-practices
Contact
NIOSH, Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 18070, Pittsburgh, PA 15236
CODEN
WWJOA9
Publication Date
20050801
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
GHomce@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2005
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
8
ISSN
0043-1443
NIOSH Division
PRL
Priority Area
Disease and Injury: Traumatic Injuries
Source Name
Water Well Journal
State
PA
TOP