Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Trends in rates of occupational homicides, 1993-2002.

Authors
Hendricks-S; Anderson-K; Jenkins-L
Source
2005 National Injury Prevention and Control Conference, May 9-11, 2005, Denver, Colorado. Atlanta, GA: Centers and Disease Control and Prevention, 2005 May; :105
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20027972
Abstract
Homicide has varied between the second and third leading cause of occupational fatality in the United States during the years 1993-2002. Overall homicide rates in the United States during this same period have demonstrated a significant decline. Using data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) and the Current Population Survey (CPS), trends in the rates of occupational homicide were evaluated for the years 1993-2002 by occupation, industry, sex, age, race, and state. Using CFOI, trends in the number of occupational homicides were evaluated for the circumstance, location, and time of the incident. Overall, there was a significant decline in the rates of occupational homicide of approximately 8% per year during this time period; however, this trend was not consistent for all subgroups considered. Taxi cab drivers and chauffeurs demonstrated the greatest decline of all occupational subgroups and this decline was significantly greater than the decline in overall occupational homicide rates. While there was a decline in the rates of occupational homicide for the health services and public administration industries, this decline was not as great as the overall decline in occupational homicide rates. When looking at the circumstance of the homicide, only homicides which were robbery related demonstrated a significant decline. Neither the circumstances of violence by disgruntled customers/clients, disgruntled workers/former workers, nor domestic violence demonstrated a significant decline in the number of occupational homicides during this period. While workplace homicides are declining in the US, the declines are not occurring uniformly across demographic and occupational categories. Future research and prevention efforts should focus on replicating successes and addressing those areas where little or no change has occurred. The participants will be able to: 1. Identify the recent trends which occurred in occupational homicides 2. Identify which industries and occupations demonstrated the greatest decline in occupational homicides 3. Identify which circumstances, demographics, and events demonstrated the greatest decline in occupational homicides.
Keywords
Occupational-hazards; Traumatic-injuries; Mortality-rates; Mortality-data; Injuries; Workers; Work-environment; Demographic-characteristics; Age-factors; Racial-factors; Sex-factors; Injury-prevention; Safety-measures; Safety-research; Safety-education; Surveillance
Publication Date
20050509
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings; Abstract
Fiscal Year
2005
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
DSR
Source Name
2005 National Injury Prevention and Control Conference, May 9-11, 2005, Denver, Colorado
State
WV; GA; CO
TOP