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A laboratory investigation of the effectiveness of various skin and surface decontaminants for aliphatic polyisocyanates.

Authors
Bello-D; Woskie-SR; Streicher-RP; Stowe-MH; Sparer-J; Redlich-CA; Cullen-MR; Liu-Y
Source
J Environ Monit 2005 Jul; 7(7):716-721
NIOSHTIC No.
20027715
Abstract
Isocyanates may cause contact dermatitis and respiratory sensitization leading to asthma. Dermal exposure to aliphatic isocyanates in auto body shops is very common. However, little is known about the effectiveness of available commercial products used for decontaminating aliphatic polyisocyanates. This experimental study evaluated the decontamination effectiveness of aliphatic polyisocyanates for several skin and surface decontaminants available for use in the auto body industry. The efficiency of two major decontamination mechanisms, namely (i) consumption of free isocyanate groups via chemical reactions with active hydrogen components of the decontaminant and (ii) physical removal processes such as dissolution were studied separately for each decontaminant. Considerable differences were observed among surface decontaminants in their rate of isocyanate consumption, of which those containing free amine groups performed the best. Overall, Pine-Sol MEA containing monoethanolamine was the most efficient surface decontaminant, operating primarily via chemical reaction with the isocyanate group. Polypropylene glycol (PPG) had the highest physical removal efficiency and the lowest reaction rate with isocyanates. All tested skin decontaminants performed similarly, accomplishing decontamination primarily via physical processes and removing 70-80% of isocyanates in one wiping. Limitations of these skin decontaminants are discussed and alternatives presented. In vitro testing using animal skins and in vivo testing with field workers are being conducted to further assess the efficiency and identify related determinants.
Keywords
Isocyanates; Dermatitis; Respiratory-system-disorders; Aliphatic-compounds; Sensitization; Decontamination; Automobile-repair-shops; Skin-exposure; Chemical-reactions; Skin-absorption; Skin-irritants; Surface-properties; Laboratory-testing
Contact
Harvard School of Public Health, Exposure, Epidemiology and Risk Program, Landmark Center, West/404F, 401 Park Drive, Boston, MA 02215
CODEN
JEMOFW
CAS No.
822-06-0; 4098-71-9; 141-43-5; 25322-69-4
Publication Date
20050701
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
dbello@hsph.harvard.edu
Funding Amount
2634676
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2005
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003457; Grant-Number-R01-OH-034506; Grant-Number-R01-OH-004246
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
1464-0325
NIOSH Division
DART
Priority Area
Disease and Injury: Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Research Tools and Approaches: Exposure Assessment Methods
Source Name
Journal of Environmental Monitoring
State
CT; MA; OH
Performing Organization
Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
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