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Hernia: is it a work-realted condition?

Authors
Knag-SK; Burnett-CA; Freund-E; Sestito-J
Source
Am J Ind Med 1999 Dec; 36(6):638-644
NIOSHTIC No.
20027682
Abstract
Background: Development of hernias among active workers is a major occupational problem, however, the work-relatedness of hernias has not been well investigated. It is a difficult question for occupational and primary care physicians who must often address whether a worker with an inguinal hernia should be restricted from work requiring lifting of heavy objects. Methods: To evaluate the possible work-relatedness of inguinal hernias, a cross-sectional study was performed. The goal of the study was to determine hernia incidence according to occupation with the Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses from the Bureau of Labor Statistics in 1994. Hernia incidence rates (per 10,000 workers) for industry and occupation categories were calculated with the estimates of the number of hernias in males and the employed male workers from the Current Population Survey. Rate ratios (RR) of hernia incidence rates were calculated. Results: In 1994, an estimated 30,791 work-related hernias in males were reported by US private establishments. The occupation groups with the highest RR were laborers and handlers (RR, 2.47; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.14+/-2.80), machine operators (RR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.81+/-2.44), and mechanics and repairers (RR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.43+/-2.00). Conclusions: Rate ratios for hernias vary considerably within industries and occupations, with the highest ratios found in industries and occupations involving manual labor. This provides support for the hypothesis that the hernias are work-related, especially in work involving strenuous, heavy manual labor.
Keywords
Manual-lifting; Abdomen; Age-factors; Statistical-analysis; Cumulative-trauma; Cumulative-trauma-disorders; Occupational-health; Occupational-hazards; Occupational-diseases; Anthropometry; Biological-monitoring; Injury-prevention; Injuries; Traumatic-injuries; Author Keywords: hernia; industry; occupation; strenous manual work
Contact
Seong-Kyu Kang, MD, KISCO, 34-6 Kusan-dong, Inchon 403-711, Republic of Korea
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
19990701
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
skk2@unitel.co.kr
Fiscal Year
1999
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
6
ISSN
0271-3586
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
OH
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