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Occupational exposures during the preparation of pseudo narcotics for canine training.

Authors
Dowell-C
Source
American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition, May 21-26, 2005, Anaheim, California. Fairfax, VA: American Industrial Hygiene Association, 2005 May; :58
NIOSHTIC No.
20026929
Abstract
NIOSH received a request for a Health Hazard Evaluation at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Canine Enforcement Training Center in Front Royal, Virginia. The request concerned potential exposures from the preparation of pseudo narcotics. Seven personal breathing zone (PBZ) air samples were collected for total particulates on workers in the mix room. Nine general area (GA) air samples were collected for total particulates in the mix and package rooms. Two PBZ air samples were collected for acetic acid on workers in the mix room and 4 GA air samples were collected in the mix and package room. Three GA air samples were collected for benzaldehyde and piperonal and 4 GA air samples for methyl benzoate in the mix room. The particulate contained cab-o-sil and microcrystalline cellulose. All of the total particulate PBZ air samples collected on workers in the mix room exceed the OSHA PEL for particulates not otherwise classified (PNOC) and the ACGIH TLV for cellulose. Their concentrations ranged from 21 to 110 mg/m3 with an average of 43 mg/m3. Workers lean forward and place their heads inside drums, scooping out powder near the bottom. This accounts for the high airborne dust concentrations. One of 2 acetic acid PBZ air samples collected on workers in the mix room exceed the NIOSH REL, OSHA PEL, and ACGIH TLV. This sample was collected on the worker who measures acetic acid. All other air samples collected were below relevant evaluation criteria. There is a potential for excessive particulate and acetic acid exposure in the mix room of the pseudo drug building. Based on a description of other work activities not directly observed, there is also a potential for respiratory hazards during the chopping of marijuana bales. Recommendations included ventilation improvements, modified work practices, and use of respiratory protection.
Keywords
Law-enforcement; Law-enforcement-workers; Respiratory-protection; Respiratory-protective-equipment; Ventilation-systems; Ventilation
Publication Date
20050521
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
2005
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Source Name
American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition, May 21-26, 2005, Anaheim, California
State
OH; CA
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