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Use of a directional spray system design to control respirable dust and face gas concentrations around a continuous mining machine.

Authors
Goodman-GVR; Pollock-DE
Source
J Occup Environ Hyg 2004 Dec; 1(12):806-815
NIOSHTIC No.
20025738
Abstract
A laboratory study assessed the impacts of water spray pressure, face ventilation quantity, and line brattice setback distance on respirable dust and sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas concentrations around a continuous mining machine using a sprayfan or directional spray system. Dust levels were measured at locations representing the mining machine operator and the standard and off-standard shuttle car operators, and in the return airway. The results showed that changes in all three independent variables significantly affected log-transformed dust levels at the three operator sampling locations. Changes in setback distance impacted return airway dust levels. Laboratory testing also identified numerous variable interactions affecting dust levels. Tracer gas levels were measured on the left and right sides of the cutting drum and in the return. Untransformed gas levels around the cutting drum were significantly affected by changes in water pressure, face ventilation quantity, and setback distance. Only a few interactions were identified that significantly affected these concentrations. Gas levels in the return airway were grouped by face ventilation quantity. Return gas levels measured at the low curtain quantity were generally unaffected by changes in water pressure or curtain setback distance. At the high curtain quantity, return airway gas levels were affected by curtain setback distance. A field study was conducted to assess the impact of these parameters in an actual mining operation. These data showed that respirable dust levels may have been impacted by a change in water pressure and, to a lesser extent, by an increase in curtain setback distance. A series of tracer gas pulse tests was also conducted during this study. The results showed that effectiveness of the face ventilation was impacted by changes in curtain flow quantity and setback distance. Laboratory testing supported similar conclusions.
Keywords
Respirable-dust; Coal-mining; Coal-dust; Engineering-controls; Exposure-assessment; Silica-dusts; Underground-mining; Mining-equipment; Mining-industry; Gases; Ventilation; Air-flow; Dust-sampling; Methanes; Coal-mine-dust; Silica
Contact
NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 18070, Pittsburgh, PA 15236
CODEN
JOEHA2
CAS No.
74-82-8; 2551-62-4; 7631-86-9
Publication Date
20041201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
gcg8@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2005
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
12
ISSN
1545-9624
NIOSH Division
PRL
Priority Area
Research Tools and Approaches: Control Technology and Personal Protective Equipment
Source Name
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
State
PA; GA; CA
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