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Evaluation of a computer-simulation model for human ambulation on stilts.

Authors
Pan-CS; Miller-KM; Chiou-S; Wu-JZ
Source
JMMB 2004 Sep; 4(3):283-303
NIOSHTIC No.
20025585
Abstract
Stilts are elevated tools that are frequently used by construction workers to raise workers 18 to 40 inches above the ground without the burden of erecting scaffolding or a ladder. Some previous studies indicated that construction workers perceive an increased risk of injury when working on stilts. However, no in-depth biomechanical analyses have been conducted to examine the fall risks associated with the use of stilts. The objective of this study is to evaluate a computer-simulation stilts model. Three construction workers were recruited for walking tasks on 24-inch stilts. The model was evaluated using whole body center of mass and ground reaction forces. A PEAK motion system and two Kistler force platforms were used to collect data on both kinetic and kinematic measures. Inverse- and direct-dynamics simulations were performed using a model developed using commercial software ADAMS and LifeMOD. For three coordinates (X, Y, Z) of the center of mass, the results of univariate analyses indicated very small variability for the mean difference between the model predictions and the experimental measurements. The results of correlation analyses indicated similar trends for the three coordinates. Plotting the resultant and vertical ground reaction force for both right and left feet showed small discrepancies, but the overall shape was identical. The percentage differences between the model and the actual measurement for three coordinates of the center of mass, as well as resultant and vertical ground reaction force, were within 20%. This newly-developed stilt walking model may be used to assist in improving the design of stilts.
Keywords
Computer-models; Computer-software; Simulation-methods; Construction-workers; Construction-equipment; Tools; Risk-factors; Risk-analysis; Injuries; Models; Biomechanics
Contact
NIOSH, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
CODEN
JMMBBB
Publication Date
20040901
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
cpan@cdc.gov
Funding Type
Construction
Fiscal Year
2004
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
0219-5194
NIOSH Division
DSR; HELD
Priority Area
Disease and Injury: Traumatic Injuries
Source Name
Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology
State
WV
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