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Expanded opportunities for prevention of young worker injuries.

Authors
Sinclair-RC
Source
NOIRS 2000--Abstracts of the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium 2000, Pittsburgh, PA, October 17-19. Pittsburgh, PA: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 2000 Oct; :40
NIOSHTIC No.
20025344
Abstract
There is little disagreement that there is a need for information and education about young worker injuries. Youth, parents, employers, teachers, health departments, labor departments, and health care providers tend to be surprisingly uninformed about the hazards youth face at work and what can be done to prevent injuries. In 1995, NIOSH funded three community-based health education projects to learn how to increase prevention knowledge. Those projects yielded a number of lessons that were collected in a resource guide for community leaders on how to intervene at the community level. In spite of those lessons, there was much more to be learned. In particular, methods to institutionalize education about young worker issues in communities were still underdeveloped. Consequently, in 1998 and 1999, new projects were funded to expand knowledge about introducing and sustaining interest in young worker issues among communities. Each project looks at a different aspect of community interventions and brings different expertise to bear. Each project also uses different evaluation methods. One project is conducting a rigorous evaluation of curriculum in schools in Minnesota. Another project is working in contrasting ethnic communities in Los Angeles to learn about different attitudes toward young worker injuries. The third project is facilitating state-level teams in New England who are conducting small health education projects in selected communities. These projects are providing further lessons about how to intervene, but they also provide a spectrum of evaluation challenges. They attempt to address different levels of social influence, so they must be evaluated in different ways. The results of these projects may inform the progress of community intervention evaluations.
Keywords
Accidents; Accident-prevention; Injuries; Traumatic-injuries; Injury-prevention; Education; Safety-education; Safety-programs; Safety-practices; Age-factors; Age-groups; Children
Publication Date
20001017
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings; Abstract
Fiscal Year
2001
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
EID
Source Name
NOIRS 2000 Abstracts of the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium 2000, Pittsburgh, PA., October 17-19, 2000
State
PA; OH; CA; MN
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