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Health hazard evaluation of methyl bromide soil fumigations.

Authors
Lenhart-S; Gagnon-YT
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg 1999 Jul; 14(7):407-412
NIOSHTIC No.
20025301
Abstract
Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) officers of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service apply a variety of soil fumigants and post-emergence herbicides in their attempts to eradicate witchweed from the United States. They use methyl bromide to spot fumigate small, isolated areas of soil contaminated by witchweed. Witchweed (Striga asiateca) is a parasitic annual that can severely damage corn, sorghum, sugarcane, dryland rice, and more than 60 other grass species. After its seeds germinate, witchweed penetrates the roots of host plants, robbing them of water and nutrients.(2) Though witchweed is one of the most serious crop pests hindering cereal crop production in Africa, the Middle East, and Far East, eastern parts of North Carolina and South Carolina are the only places in the Western Hemisphere where it has been found.
Keywords
Plants; Plant-substances; Soil-analysis; Soil-sampling; Herbicides; Soil-conditioners
CODEN
AOEHE9
CAS No.
74-83-9
Publication Date
19990701
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1999
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
1047-322X
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS; DPSE
Source Name
Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
State
OH
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