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Epidemiology of work-related aviation fatalities in Alaska, 1990-94.

Authors
Garrett-LC; Conway-GA; Manwaring-JC
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med 1998 Dec; 69(12):1131-1136
NIOSHTIC No.
20025246
Abstract
Alaska, with less than one-half of 1% of the United States workforce, accounts for 9% of all occupational aviation fatalities nationally; 30% of all occupational fatalities in Alaska are related to aviation. To understand this high mortality, we investigated occupational aviation crashes to identify risk factors. Occupational aviation fatalities in Alaska during 1990-94 were examined using National Transportation Safety Board reports and merged with records from the Alaska Occupational Injury Surveillance System. There were 876 aircraft crashes; 407 (46%) were work-related. Occupational crashes were 2.2 times (CI: 1.5, 3.2) more likely to result in fatalities than non-occupational crashes. Risk factors identified included poor weather conditions defined as Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). A crash during IMC was 5.3 times (CI: 3.5, 7.9) more likely to result in fatalities than crashes in other conditions. Of aircraft involved in fatal occupational incidents, 33% were not completely destroyed, allowing the potential for survivors. An estimated 30% reduction in fatalities could have occurred if current technology in occupant protection had been used.
Keywords
Epidemiology; Traumatic-injuries; Occupational-hazards; Mortality-rates; Mortality-data; Risk-factors; Aircraft
CODEN
ASEMCG
Publication Date
19981201
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1999
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
12
ISSN
0095-6562
NIOSH Division
DSR
Source Name
Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine
State
GA; AK
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