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Behavioral-diagnostic analysis of compliance with universal precautions among nurses.

Authors
DeJoy-DM; Searcy-CA; Murphy-LR; Gershon-RR
Source
J Occup Health Psychol 2000 Jan; 5(1):127-141
NIOSHTIC No.
20024584
Abstract
This study used the PRECEDE model (L.W. Green, M.W. Kreuter, S.G. Deeds, & K.B. Partridge, 1980) to examine individual, job-task, and environmental-organizational factors related to compliance with universal precautions (UP) among nurses. Structural equation modeling showed that the hypothesized model did a better job predicting general compliance (R2 = .41) than compliance with personal protective equipment (PPE; R2 = .18). All 3 categories of diagnostic factors (predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing) influenced general compliance, but predisposing factors were relatively unimportant for compliance with PPE. With a set of nested models, the greatest improvement in model fit occurred when the indirect effects of reinforcing factors were added. A positive safety climate may increase the likelihood that the work environment will contain features that enable workers to comply with safe work practices.
Keywords
Behavior; Behavior-patterns; Behavioral-testing; Nurses; Nursing; Health-care-personnel; Environmental-factors; Models; Personal-protective-equipment; Work-practices; Work-environment
Contact
David M. DeJoy, Department of Health Promotion and Behavior, 300 River Road, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-6522
CODEN
JOHPFC
Publication Date
20000101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
ddejoy@coe.uga.edu
Funding Amount
148530
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2000
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003459
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
1076-8998
NIOSH Division
DART
Source Name
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
State
GA; OH
Performing Organization
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
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