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Flexion-relaxation response to static lumbar flexion in males and females.

Authors
Solomonow-M; Baratta-RV; Banks-A; Freudenberger-C; Zhou-BH
Source
Clin Biomech 2003 May; 18(4):273-279
NIOSHTIC No.
20024548
Abstract
An attempt was made to develop an in vivo model that could explain the neurophysiological and biomechanical processes active in the development of the idiopathic low back disorder common in workers who perform repetitive lifting tasks in industry. Passive cyclic flexion of the feline lumbar spine at 0.1 HZ for 20 min resulted in creep of the supraspinous ligament and other lumbar viscoelastic tissues as well as spasms superimposed on a decreasing electromyogram (EMG) elicited reflexly from the multifidus muscles. Rest for 7 h did not allow full recovery of the viscoelastic creep; the multifidus EMG gradually increased with initial and delayed hyperexcitability. Increasing the peak load of the cyclic flexion resulted in larger creep in the passive tissues and required a longer time for recovery of reflex EMG activity and longer delayed hyperexcitability, but development of spasms and hyperexcitability was unaffected. It is conceivable that damage to the viscoelastic tissues elicits an inflammatory process that in turn triggers a transient neuromuscular disorder. The present findings provide a biomechanical and neurophysiological explanation for a common idiopathic low back disorder as well as for the development of a cumulative trauma disorder often seen in workers engaged in repetitive lumbar flexion.
Keywords
Muscles; Muscular-disorders; In-vivo-study; Animal-studies; Animals; Laboratory-animals; Spinal-cord; Tension; Back-injuries; Spasms; Humans; Women; Men; Musculoskeletal-system; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders
Contact
Moshe Solomonow, Bioengineering Laboratory, Occupational Medicine Research Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 2025 Gravier Street, Suite 400, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA
CODEN
CLBIEW
Publication Date
20030501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
msolom@lsuhsc.edu
Funding Amount
695194
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-004079
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0268-0033
Priority Area
Disease and Injury: Low Back Disorders
Source Name
Clinical Biomechanics
State
LA
Performing Organization
Louisiana State University, Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
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