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Interaction of blood lead and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase genotype on markers of heme synthesis and sperm production in lead smelter workers.

Authors
Alexander-BH; Checkoway-H; Costa-Mallen-P; Faustman-EM; Woods-JS; Kelsey-KT; Van Netten-C; Costa-LG
Source
Environ Health Perspect 1998 Apr; 106(4):213-216
NIOSHTIC No.
20024506
Abstract
The gene that encodes gamma-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) has a polymorphism that may modify lead toxicokinetics and ultimately influence individual susceptibility to lead poisoning. To evaluate the effect of the ALAD polymorphism on lead-mediated outcomes, a cross-sectional study of male employees from a lead-zinc smelter compared associations between blood lead concentration and markers of heme synthesis and semen quality with respect to ALAD genotype. Male employees were recruited via postal questionnaire to donate blood and urine for analysis of blood lead, zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), urinary coproporphyrin (CPU), and ALAD genotype, and semen samples for semen analysis. Of the 134 workers who had ALAD genotypes completed, 114 (85%) were ALAD1-1 (ALAD1) and 20 (15%) were ALAD1-2 (ALAD2). The mean blood lead concentrations for ALAD1 and ALAD2 were 23.1 and 28.4 microg/dl (p = 0.08), respectively. ZPP/heme ratios were higher in ALAD1 workers (68.6 vs. 57.8 micromol/ml; p = 0.14), and the slope of the blood lead ZPP linear relationship was greater for ALAD1 (2.83 vs. 1.50, p = 0.06). No linear relationship between CPU and blood lead concentration was observed for either ALAD1 or ALAD2. The associations of blood lead concentration with ZPP, CPU, sperm count, and sperm concentration were more evident in workers with the ALAD1 genotype and blood lead concentrations >/= 40 microg/dl. The ALAD genetic polymorphism appears to modify the association between blood lead concentration and ZPP. However, consistent modification of effects were not found for CPU, sperm count, or sperm concentration.
Keywords
Occupational-exposure; Exposure-levels; Blood-analysis; Lead-compounds; Workers; Work-environment; Smelters; Epidemiology; Biomarkers; Reproductive-effects; Demographic-characteristics; Sex-factors; Reproductive-system-disorders
Contact
B.H. Alexander, Department of Environmental Health, Box 358772, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 USA
CODEN
EVHPAZ
CAS No.
7440-66-6; 7439-92-1
Publication Date
19980401
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
45208
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1998
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R03-OH-002966
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0091-6765
Priority Area
Other Occupational Concerns
Source Name
Environmental Health Perspectives
State
WA
Performing Organization
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
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