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Occupational injury events leading to hospitalization.

Authors
Tyler-KL; Jackson-LL
Source
NOIRS 2003-Abstracts of the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium 2003, October 28-30, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Pittsburgh, PA: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 2003 Oct; :65-66
NIOSHTIC No.
20024235
Abstract
To estimate the number of nonfatal occupational hospitalized injuries and illnesses treated in emergency departments and to characterize the injury events. Data were obtained from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). NEISS is a national probability sample of United States 24-hour hospital emergency departments. In 1999, there were 69,800 +/- 16,800 (+/- 95% confidence interval) nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses treated in emergency departments that resulted in hospitalization among workers 15 years and older. These hospitalized injuries occurred at a rate of 5.3 per 10,000 full-time equivalent workers (FTE). Males accounted for 57,100 +/- 14,300 (81%) of hospitalized injuries and had a rate (7.5 +/- 1.9/10,000 FTE) that was about 3 times higher than for females (2.3 +/- 0.6/10,000 FTE). Overall, 70% of injury events leading to hospitalization involved contact with objects and equipment (26,200 +/- 5,400) and falls (22,700 +/- 6,500), and predominantly occurred to males (89% of all contact with objects; 79% of all falls). Manufacturing injuries most commonly involved contact with objects and equipment (6,500 +/- 2,300) and falls (1,500 +/- 900), although falls were less prevalent. Among construction workers, who had the highest number of falls, the proportion of falls was greater (6,500 +/- 3,300) then contact with objects and equipment events (5,300 +/- 2,000). Falls among males were usually to a lower level (74%) and most commonly occurred within the construction industry. Most falls among females took place on the same level (63%) and predominantly in the services and wholesale/retail trades industries. Prevention of the most severe workplace injuries must focus on contact with objects and equipment and falls, taking industry into account.
Keywords
Health-care-facilities; Medical-care; Injuries; Injury-prevention; Emergency-care; Emergency-treatment; Sampling; Worker-health; Demographic-characteristics; Sex-factors; Age-factors; Construction-industry; Construction-workers; Retail-workers
Publication Date
20031028
Document Type
Abstract; Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Fiscal Year
2004
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
DSR
Source Name
NOIRS 2003-Abstracts of the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium 2003, October 28-30, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
State
WV; PA
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