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Roadway fatalities involving passenger cars, light trucks, and vans: are occupational fatalities different?

Authors
Pratt-S
Source
APHA 131st Annual Meeting and Exposition, San Francisco, California, November 15-19, 2003. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 2003 Nov; :70319
NIOSHTIC No.
20023995
Abstract
Few studies have examined occupational fatalities involving vehicles other than large trucks. This study compared fatal occupational crashes involving passenger cars, light trucks, or vans with similar non-occupational crashes. The data source was the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), a national census of police-reported fatal crashes. Analysis was limited to decedents aged 18 or older. FARS identified 679 occupational crashes in 1999 and 2000 that killed 707 workers in 686 vehicles. These were compared with 50,088 non-occupational crashes involving 51,361 vehicles with 55,883 fatally injured occupants. Occupational crashes were more likely than non-occupational crashes to be collisions between vehicles (56% vs. 49%), and to occur in daylight (64% vs. 52%). Light trucks or vans accounted for 62% of worker vehicles, compared with 36% of non-worker vehicles. Worker vehicles were far more likely to be registered to business or government (41% vs. 4%). Occupational crashes were less likely than non-occupational crashes to have at least one drunk driver involved (not necessarily the worker) (19% vs. 37%). Workers were less likely than non-workers to have been identified as "driving too fast" (18% vs. 27%), and were slightly more likely than non-workers to have been using restraints (37% vs. 35%). Fatally injured workers in cars, light trucks, and vans differed from non-workers in that they had lower levels of some risk factors, and were more likely to die in collisions with other vehicles. The results suggest a need to focus workplace interventions on defensive driving, alcohol awareness, and restraint use.
Keywords
Occupational-hazards; Occupational-accidents; Motor-vehicles; Mortality-data; Mortality-rates; Injuries; Traumatic-injuries; Risk-factors
Contact
Division of Safety Research, Surveillance and Field Investigations Branch, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1095 Willowdale Road, MS-H1808, Morgantown, WV 26505
Publication Date
20031116
Document Type
Abstract
Email Address
spratt@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2004
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
DSR
Source Name
APHA 131st Annual Meeting and Exposition, San Francisco, California, November 15-19, 2003
State
WV
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