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Appetizing rancidity of apoptotic cells for macrophages: oxidation, externalization, and recognition of phosphatidylserine.

Authors
Kagan-VE; Borisenko-GG; Serinkan-BF; Tyurina-YY; Tyurin-VA; Jiang-J; Liu-SX; Shvedova-AA; Fabisiak-JP; Uthaisang-W; Fadeel-B
Source
Am J Physiol, Lung Cell Mol Physiol 2003 Jul; 285(1):L1-L17
NIOSHTIC No.
20023022
Abstract
Programmed cell death (apoptosis) functions as a mechanism to eliminate unwanted or irreparably damaged cells ultimately leading to their orderly phagocytosis in the absence of calamitous inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that the generation of free radical intermediates and subsequent oxidative stress are implicated as part of the apoptotic execution process. Oxidative stress may simply be an unavoidable yet trivial byproduct of the apoptotic machinery; alternatively, intermediates or products of oxidative stress may act as essential signals for the execution of the apoptotic program. This review is focused on the specific role of oxidative stress in apoptotic signaling, which is realized via phosphatidylserine-dependent pathways leading to recognition of apoptotic cells and their effective clearance. In particular, the mechanisms involved in selective phosphatidylserine oxidation in the plasma membrane during apoptosis and its association with disturbances of phospholipid asymmetry leading to phosphatidylserine externalization and recognition by macrophage receptors are at the center of our discussion. The putative importance of this oxidative phosphatidylserine signaling in lung physiology and disease are also discussed.
Keywords
Cell-morphology; Phagocytic-activity; Free-radicals; Oxidative-processes; Plasma-membrane; Lung-function; Author Keywords: JB6 cells; particulate matter; silicosis; gene knockout mice
Contact
V. E. Kagan, Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Health, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260
CODEN
APLPE7
Publication Date
20030701
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
kagan@pitt.edu
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
1040-0605
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Disease and Injury: Allergic and Irritant Dermatitis
Source Name
American Journal of Physiology: Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology
State
PA; WV
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