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Utility of NIOSH health hazard evaluation data for hazard surveillance.

Authors
McKernan-J; Martinez-A; Boiano-J; Hartle-R
Source
American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition, June 1-6, 2002, San Diego, California. Fairfax, VA: American Industrial Hygiene Association, 2002 Jun; :103-104
NIOSHTIC No.
20022572
Abstract
As part of NIOSH's planning efforts associated with the National Exposure at Work Survey (NEWS), selected occupational databases have been searched to provide information on the scope and magnitude of hazards and exposures by occupational group in health services (SIC 80), the first of many industry sectors to be surveyed in the NEWS. This information has been used, in addition to other sources, to prioritize hazards and occupations for subsequent evaluation in the NEWS. One of the searched databases, representing a rich source of hazard data for various occupational groups and industries is the NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) tracking database. This unpublished database was developed to track relevant data from NIOSH HHEs since the program's inception in 1971 and includes such data elements as report number, standard industrial classification (SIC) code, hazard, occupation, process, and reported health effects. A search of the HHE database focused on identifying HHEs within SIC 80 which were completed within the past 10 years. The search yielded 179 HHEs which represented most of the health services groups. Predominant hazards of concern included ethylene oxide, gluteraldehyde, anesthetic gases, latex, ribavirin, tuberculosis and ergonomic risk factors. Occupational groups most notably associated with these hazards included nurses, physicians, dentists and optometrists. A rank order listing of the top hazards and affected occupational groups will be presented by hazard type and other data elements. Apart from descriptive information, strengths and limitations of the HHE database will be presented relative to its applicability for hazard surveillance. Furthermore, these data can be used by the healthcare industry to target intervention activities for exposed occupations.
Keywords
Health-hazards; Hazards; Occupational-exposure; Occupational-hazards; Occupational-health; Risk-factors; Health-care-personnel; Health-care-facilities
CAS No.
75-21-8; 111-30-8
Publication Date
20020601
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
2002
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Source Name
American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition, June 1-6, 2002, San Diego, California
State
OH; CA
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