Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

An alternate characterization of hazard in occupational epidemiology: years of life lost per years worked.

Authors
Park-RM; Bailer-AJ; Stayner-LT; Halperin-W; Gilbert-SJ
Source
Am J Ind Med 2002 Jun; 42(1):1-10
NIOSHTIC No.
20022223
Abstract
Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and other measures of relative risk by themselves may not suffice as descriptors of occupational hazards for many audiences including decision-makers and those at direct risk from hazardous work. To explore other approaches, we calculated excess years of potential life lost and excess lifetime risk for both lung diseases and fatal injuries in a cohort of uranium miners with historical records of exposure to radon gas. We used relatively simple life table (SMR) methods and also analyzed lung cancer mortality with Poisson regression methods permitting control for smoking. Among uranium miners hired after 1950, whose all-cause SMR was 1.5, 28 percent would experience premature death from lung diseases or injury in a lifetime of uranium mining. On average, each miner lost 1.5 yr of potential life due to mining-related lung cancer, or almost 3 months of life for each year employed in uranium mining. As a consequence of all excess lung disease and injury risks combined, a year of mining was associated with 5.9 months loss of potential life. For each year actually working underground, miners lost more than 8 months of potential life. When controlled for smoking (and healthy worker effect) with Poisson regression, the estimates for radon-related lung cancer effects were slightly larger. Although chronic disease deaths dominated in excess years of life lost (due to radon, silica and possibly other exposures), more years were lost on average per individual injury death (38 yr), than per excess lung cancer (20 yr) or other lung disease death (18 yr). Fatal-injury dominated the potential years of life lost up to about age 40. CONCLUSIONS: Years of life lost per years employed provides another, more intuitive summary of occupational mortality risk.
Keywords
Mortality-data; Smoking; Cancer; Mine-workers; Lung-cancer; Mortality-data; Age-groups; Uranium-mining; Uranium-miners; Uranium-compounds; Respiratory-system-disorders; Pulmonary-system-disorders
Contact
Risk Evaluation Division, EID, NIOSH, 4676 COlumbia Parkway, MS C-15, Cincinnati, OH 45226
CODEN
AJIMD8
CAS No.
7440-61-1
Publication Date
20020601
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
rhp9@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2002
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0271-3586
NIOSH Division
EID; DSHEFS
Priority Area
Research Tools and Approaches: Risk Assessment Methods
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
OH; NJ
TOP