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Electrical charges on airborne microorganisms.

Authors
Mainelis-G; Willeke-K; Baron-PA; Reponen-T; Grinshpun-SA; Gorny-RL; Trakumas-S
Source
J Aerosol Sci 2001 Sep; 32(9):1087-1110
NIOSHTIC No.
20021805
Abstract
We have investigated the parameters affecting the magnitude and polarity of the electric charges carried by biological particles in the airborne state. A recently developed experimental setup through which we analyzed the electric charges imposed on airborne particles by a means of induction charging (Mainelis et al. (Aerosol Sci. Technol. 2001, submitted for publication)) was utilized for this research. In this study, the microorganisms were aerosolized under controlled conditions and an electric mobility analyzer extracted particles of specific electric mobility. The extracted microorganisms were then analyzed by an optical particle size spectrometer. The amount of electric charge carried by airborne microorganisms was found to depend on the dispersion method and can be more than 10,000 elementary electric charges. This finding contrasts with the low electric charge levels carried by non-biological particles. Our data show that repeated pneumatic dispersion of sensitive bacteria affects their structural integrity, which, in turn, changes the magnitude of electric charges carried by these bacteria. We have concluded that the amount of electric charge carried by aerosolized bacteria may be used as an indicator of mechanical stress. It was also found that the electrical conductivity and the pH level of a bacterial suspension increase during aerosolization from a Collison nebulizer. Thus, these two parameters may be used as indicators of the mechanical stress, injury and loss in viability, endured by bacteria during aerosolization, i.e., measuring the electrical conductivity and pH level of bacterial suspensions may be a simple and convenient method for monitoring the "wear and tear" of the bacteria suspended in deionized water.
Keywords
Microorganisms; Electrical-charge; Bacteria; Aerosols; Biohazards; Particulates; Particulate-sampling-methods; Airborne-particles; Electrical-fields
Contact
Aerosol Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 670056, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056, USA
CODEN
JALSB7
Publication Date
20010901
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
mainelis@uc.edu
Funding Amount
933298
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2001
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003463
Issue of Publication
9
ISSN
0021-8502
NIOSH Division
DART
Priority Area
Research Tools and Approaches: Exposure Assessment Methods
Source Name
Journal of Aerosol Science
State
OH
Performing Organization
University of Cincinnati
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