Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Occupational fatalities among older workers in the United States.

Authors
Marsh-SM; Myers-JR
Source
NOIRS 2000--Abstracts of the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium 2000, Pittsburgh, PA, October 17-19, 2000. Pittsburgh, PA: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 2000 Oct; :1
NIOSHTIC No.
20021004
Abstract
Workers 55 years of age and older have been identified as a population at high risk of fatal occupational injuries. This is especially true for the agricultural production industry. The need to understand these high fatality risks for older workers is increasing in importance because of the aging of the U.S. workforce. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) surveillance system, for the years 1992 through 1997, were analyzed to provide descriptive statistics on all occupational fatalities occurring to workers 55 year of age and older, and statistics specific to the production agriculture industry. Fatality rates were calculated based on employment information from the BLS Current Population Survey (CPS). Between 1992 and 1997, there were 36,932 occupational fatalities identified by CFOI, of which 7,967 (22%) occurred to workers 55 years of age and older, for a fatality rate of 8.8 deaths/100,000 workers. The leading sources of injury for these older worker deaths were: highway vehicles (27%); plant and industrial vehicles (13%); and floors and other working surfaces (12%). The leading events causing these fatalities were: highway transportation (21%); non-highway transportation (13%); and violent acts and assaults (13%). Approximately 25 percent of these deaths occurred in the Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing industrial division. During the same time period, there were 3,503 deaths in production agriculture, of which 1,823 (52%) occurred to workers 55 years of age and older. The fatality rate for these older production agriculture workers was 46 deaths/100,000 workers. The leading sources of injury for these older production agriculture workers were: tractors (45%); trucks (8%); and agricultural mowers (5%). These data indicate that older workers in general, and older workers in production agriculture specifically, are a key special population to address in future injury prevention efforts.
Keywords
Accident-rates; Accident-statistics; Accidents; Accident-prevention; Injuries; Traumatic-injuries; Injury-prevention; Surveillance-programs; Statistical-analysis; Epidemiology; Mortality-data; Mortality-rates; Mortality-surveys; Age-factors; Age-groups; Agricultural-workers; Agricultural-machinery; Fishing-industry; Forestry-workers; Forestry
Publication Date
20001017
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings; Abstract
Fiscal Year
2001
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
DSR
SIC Code
NAICS-1141
Source Name
NOIRS 2000 Abstracts of the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium 2000, Pittsburgh, PA., October 17-19, 2000
State
PA; WV
TOP