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Perceived postural sway and discomfort during simulated drywall lifting and hanging tasks.

Authors
Long-DJ; Pan-CS; Chiou-SS; Skidmore-PO; Zwiener-JY
Source
NOIRS 2000--Abstracts of the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium 2000, Pittsburgh, PA, October 17-19, 2000. Pittsburgh, PA: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 2000 Oct; :69
NIOSHTIC No.
20020988
Abstract
This study identified the perceived postural sway and discomfort experienced by construction workers performing simulated drywall lifting and hanging tasks under laboratory conditions. Sixty construction workers (mean age = 34.4 +/- 8.5 years) with at least 6 months of installation experience (mean experience = 8.7 +/- 6.1 years) participated in this study. From a previous field study, four methods each for the tasks of lifting and hanging drywall were identified. Participants were assigned in random order to one lifting and one hanging method. Subjects then performed four replications of the assigned lifting and hanging methods. To determine subject perception of postural instability and whole body discomfort, participants were verbally asked a questionnaire at the completion of each replication. An ANOVA with repeated measures was performed to determine which, if any, of the lifting or hanging methods were perceived by subjects as causing significantly more postural sway or discomfort. For the hanging tasks, the horizontal hanging of drywall onto a wall was perceived as causing significantly more postural sway and discomfort than the horizontal hanging of drywall onto a ceiling (p<.05). Horizontal hanging of drywall onto a wall was also perceived as causing more discomfort than the vertical hanging of drywall onto a ceiling (p<.05). Among the four lifting tasks, there were no significant differences perceived by subjects for either postural sway or discomfort. This study provides subjective balance measures for drywall lifting and hanging tasks. These results, when combined with parallel studies on kinetics and kinematics as well as the field studies, will allow recommendations for the safest lifting and hanging methods for reducing fall injuries.
Keywords
Accident-prevention; Injuries; Traumatic-injuries; Injury-prevention; Surveillance-programs; Epidemiology; Manual-lifting; Manual-materials-handling; Materials-handling; Construction-industry; Construction-workers; Humans
Publication Date
20001017
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings; Abstract
Fiscal Year
2001
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
DSR
Source Name
NOIRS 2000 Abstracts of the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium 2000, Pittsburgh, PA., October 17-19, 2000
State
PA; WV
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