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Biochemical and anatomical changes in basal ganglia of aging animals.

Authors
Hebert-MA; Stanford-JA; Gerhardt-GA
Source
Functional Neurobiology of Aging. Hof PH, Mobbs CV, eds., San Diego, CA: Academic Press, Inc., 2000 Dec; :257-282
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20020947
Abstract
Along with memory loss, a cardinal feature of senescence is deteriorating motor function. Indeed, slow movements, tremor, stooped posture, and a shuffling gait - also symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) - are hallmarks of old age as well as parkinsonism in the elderly (Bennett et al., 1996; Mortimer & Webster, 1982; Teravainen & Calne, 1983). When it was discovered that the brains of individuals who suffered from PD were deficient of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) (Ehringer & Homykiewicz, 1960) and that these symptoms were successfully reversed by the dopamine precursor L-DOPA (Cotzias et al., 1969; Cotzias et al., 1967), researchers were provided with a neurochemical mechanism underlying these deficits. Consequently, the basal ganglia became the primary neuroanatomicalloci for studies of not only PD, but also of non-pathological age-related declines in motor function. Although the majority of previous studies have focused upon age-related structural alterations in the basal ganglia, more recent studies have attempted to characterize changes in neuronal function. These functional decrements arguably account for much of the deterioration of motor capacities that are observed in senescence.
Keywords
Biochemical-analysis; Biochemical-indicators; Animals; Animal-studies; Diseases; Demographic-characteristics; Age-factors; Age-groups; Neuromotor-system; Neuromotor-function; Neuromotor-system-disorders
Publication Date
20001201
Document Type
Book or book chapter
Editors
Hof-PH; Mobbs-CV
Fiscal Year
2001
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
012351830X
NIOSH Division
HELD
Source Name
Functional Neurobiology of Aging
State
WV
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