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What constitutes an adverse health effect of air pollution?

Authors
Samet-J; Buist-S; Bascom-R; Garcia-J; Lipsett-M; Mauderly-J; Mannino-D; Rand-C; Romieu-I; Utell-M; Wagner-G
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2000 Feb; 161(2):665-673
NIOSHTIC No.
20020843
Abstract
As the twentieth century ends, the health effects of outdoor air pollution remain a public health concern in developing and developed countries alike. In the United States, the principal pollutants monitored for regulatory purposes (carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, particles, ozone, and lead; see Table 1) show general trends of declining concentrations, although ozone pollution now affects many regions of the country besides Southern California (1). Yet, even at levels of air pollution now measured in many cities of the United States, associations between air pollution levels and health indicators are being demonstrated at concentrations around those set by standards of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (2,3). In many countries of the developing world, concentrations of air pollutants are rising with industrialization and the increasing numbers of motor vehicles (4, 5). Extremely large and densely populated urban areas, often referred to as "megacities", have the potential to generate unprecedented air quality problems.
Keywords
Air-quality; Pollution; Pollutants; Health-hazards; Public-health; Environmental-pollution; Environmental-health; Environmental-hazards; Demographic-characteristics; Lead-compounds; Sulfur-compounds; Nitrogen-compounds
CODEN
AJCMED
CAS No.
630-08-0; 7439-92-1; 10102-44-0; 7446-09-5
Publication Date
20000201
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
2000
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1073-449X
NIOSH Division
DRDS
Source Name
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
State
WV
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